onlinesteamboatmuseum

Newly Acquired Items
Art & Illustrations


DredgeBenHumphreys1908forNORI

Snagboat Bucket Dredge U.S. BEN HUMPHREYS Mississippi River 1908 View 8x10 photo
eBay item number: 123779357536
$9.99
4 available / 1 sold


eBay

USEngineersMANDANatWolfPointMontana1918ForNORI

Sternwheel snagboat MANDAN
Taken at Wolf Point, Montana in 1918
Written in pen and ink on the back of the card:

"This is the government snag/dredge boat that goes from St. Louis, MO to Fort Benton, Montana once a year. It starts out in the from St. Louis and gets back just before it freezes up. It is swell inside. They always stop here and coal up both ways. We have been all through it a couple of times."

FerryGEOWMILLER_VicksburgDeltaForNORI

Ferry GEO. W. MILLER

BetsyAnnVsChrisGreeneBoatRaceForNORI

OLD BOAT COLUMN
The Betsy Ann Raced The Chris Greene

JULY 27, 2018
BY KEITH NORRINGTON
WATERWAYS JOURNAL

Nine decades ago, on July 24, 1928, the old river tradition of steamboat racing was revived at Cincinnati, Ohio.

Tens of thousands of cheering spectators lined the banks of the Ohio as the sternwheelers Betsy Ann and Chris Greene raced upstream some 26 miles to New Richmond. The Chris pushed into an early lead and crossed the finish line by two boat lengths to claim the gilded antlers, symbol of riverboat supremacy. Capt. Chris Greene was in command of his namesake, while Capt. Charles Ellsworth was master of the Betsy Ann; the owner, Capt. Fred Way, was also on board.

The race made front page headlines in newspapers across the nation.

Betsy Ann

Built at Dubuque, Iowa, in 1899 by the Iowa Iron Works, the steamboat was constructed on an iron hull that measured 165 feet in length by 33 feet in width. Originally, one boiler provided steam to cross-compound condensing engines built by the Clinton Novelty Iron Works.

The riverboat was owned by Rufus F. Learned of Natchez, Miss., and named for his wife. The Betsy ran principally in the Natchez - Bayou Sara trade and carried the U.S. Mail. The whistle came from the packet Stella Wilds, built in 1886.

The boat was sold in 1921 to D. Grover Gill of Gallipolis, Ohio, who, along with other investors, ran it in various upper Ohio River trades. In 1925, Frederick Way Sr. and Jr. bought stock and operated the vessel in the Pittsburgh - Cincinnati trade into 1929. In the autumn of 1931, the boat was chartered to tow cotton at Memphis.

The Betsy was sold to John Hay in early 1932 and converted into a towboat.

Dismantled at the St. Louis wharf in 1940, the hull eventually became a boat club on the Meramec River until it sank in 1953; remains can be seen today. The boat's pilotwheel is now exhibited in a Cape Girardeau, Mo., museum. The roof bell reposes on the grounds of Stanton Hall, at Natchez. This writer gives the bell three taps in memory of Capt. Way when visiting the historic river city.

Chris Greene

Second steamboat to carry the name, this vessel was built at Charleston, W.Va., in 1925. The steel hull (189 feet in length by 42 feet in width) was constructed by the Ward Plant and the superstructure by the Gardner Docks at Point Pleasant. The engines were recycled from the steamer Tacoma.

Built for Greene Line Steamers under the supervision of Capt. Jesse P. Hughes, the packet originally operated in the Cincinnati - Pomeroy - Charleston trade. After 1934, the riverboat ran in the Cincinnati - Louisville trade. The passenger rooms were removed in 1936 to provide space to carry automobiles.

The boat was notorious for breaking paddlewheel shafts (seven in all) and ran through itself more than a dozen times. Retired in 1947, the Chris ultimately was sold to George Harrison of Dayton, Ky., to become a boat harbor.

Largely destroyed by fire in 1968, the hull was later towed to Melbourne, Ky., and beached, where it remains today.

THE PHOTO WAS PUBLISHED IN AN ARCHIVED PRESS RELEASE PHOTO THAT WAS RUBBER STAMPED OCTOBER 4, 1930 IN ANTICIPATION OF THE 1929 BOAT RACE IN WHICH THE TOM GREENE WAS VICTORIOUS.

"Steamer Tom Greene Wins Race Upon Ohio River. Thousands Line Banks As The Betsy Ann Goes To Defeat By Small Margin"

The Baltimore Sun. July 17, 1929

Commander Tom R. Greene, pilot of the winner, received from Commander Frederick Way, 28, of the Betsy Ann, a set of historic antlers as a symbol of victory.

INTERNATIONAL NEWSREEL IN OHIO

STEAMBOATS BETSY ANN AND CHRIS GREENE WILL COMPETE IN AN OHIO RIVER BOAT RACE AT CINCINNATI, OHIO WHICH IS TO BE BROADCAST ON SATURDAY AFTERNOON, JUNE 28TH.

THE PHOTO ABOVE WAS TAKEN LAST YEAR WHEN THE BETSY ANN (LEFT) RACED THE CHRIS GREENE (RIGHT), ANOTHER BOAT IN THE GREENE LINE STEAMERS FLEET.

"Steamer Tom Greene Wins Race Upon Ohio River. Thousands Line Banks As The Betsy Ann Goes To Defeat By Small Margin"

The Baltimore Sun. July 17, 1929

Commander Tom R. Greene, pilot of the winner, received from Commander Frederick Way, 28, of the Betsy Ann, a set of historic antlers as a symbol of victory.

StrLadyLeeSnagboatHoratioGWrightWaterfrontForNORI

Atmospheric river city landing with the Lee Line steamer LADY LEE center and the snagboat HORATIO G. WRIGHT on the right.

DetroitPublishing10551BaptizedintheMississippiRiverForNORI

"SAVING SINNERS, SCENE ALONG THE MISSISSIPPI"

Library of Congress Detroit Publishing 1906-07 color lithograph post card loc.gov

Baptism of African American men in the Mississippi with onlookers in rowboats. Probably taken on the Lower Mississippi. Color added by a Detroit Publishing artist.

Detroit Publishing Co. between 1906 and 1907

No. 10551. - Illustrated in Detroit Publishing Company. Little "phostint" journeys; tours through the wonder places of America ©1912, volume 29.

image[3]

image[1]

StrW.W.StarboardThreeQuartersSternForNORI

DixieBellePortOfShakerLandingComp3PhotosForNORI

Sternwheeler DIXIE BELLE Port of Shaker Landing, Kentucky

Riverboat Cruises
Everyday, July-August @ 2:00 pm + 4:00 pm
shakervillageky.org

Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, is the site of a Shaker religious community that was active from 1805 to 1910. Following a preservationist effort that began in 1961, the site, now a National Historic Landmark, has become a popular tourist destination.

Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill, or Shakertown, as it is known by residents of the area, is located 25 miles southwest of Lexington, in Kentucky's Bluegrass region. It is a National Historic Landmark District.

Tour: Engineering a River
Board the Dixie Belle Riverboat and take a trip into Kentucky's geological and ecological past, present, and future. Cruise past limestone cliff walls along the Kentucky River that are over 450 million years old and learn about the formation of the Palisades.

This tour explores the human-engineered features along the river, discovering their importance in the history of the state and Pleasant Hill. Consider the impact of human efforts to use and control the Kentucky while experiencing the unique flora and fauna supported by the waterway.

Pricing:
$10 - Ages 13+
$5 - Ages 6-12
Free - Ages 5 and under
Tickets must be purchased at the Welcome Center. Riverboat rides depart on time from nearby Shaker Landing.
Please arrive at Shaker Landing 15 minutes prior to departure. Rides are subject to weather and river conditions and will only run if the temperature is above 50 degrees.
Adult supervision required for all children under age 18.
Group and charter rates are available!
Please call 1-800-734-5611 or email info@shakervillageky.org in advance for special pricing.

TowboatARGAND1896-1927forNORI

The steamer ARGAND

The ARGAND can be seen pushing the NEW WATER QUEEN on our Showboats page -Steamboat Museum

In the attached photo the ARGAND does not have a square bow and towing knees, so she was probably a regular packet prior to being converted into a towboat to push Price's NEW WATER QUEEN.

The towboat ARGAND was built in 1897 and sold in April 1901, to Capt. Edwin A. Price, New Martinsville, West Virginia, who used her to tow his showboat the NEW WATER QUEEN. Price usually wintered in the Muskingum River at the Lowell, Ohio lock and the ARGAND burned there in December 1927. The boiler was still there in the mud as late as 1949.

TowboatTPRobertsForNORI

T.P. ROBERTS Sternwheel Towboat
Way's Steam Towboat Directory Number T2382

Built 1906 in Marietta, Ohio at the Hammitt yard
Owned by the U.S. Corps of Engineers
Captain Park R. Brenneman (skipper)

Named for Col. T.P. Roberts, long associated with the US Engineers in Pittsburgh. She was sold at public sale in 1926 to the Morgan Davis Dock Company and they renamed her MORGAN DAVIS.

BOAT BUILDING GREAT INDUSTRY

The Marietta Register-Leader, May 6, 1907

HAMMIT CONSTRUCTION COMPANY WILL HAVE LARGE AND UP TO DATE PLANT

The work of remodeling and re-arranging the old Knox boat yards to make way for the Hammitt Construction Co., which recently took over the large plant, is well under way and already the construction of river craft is well in hand. Several new pieces of machinery are being installed and the plant placed in shape to handle any kind of work that may come up in the promotion of steamboating and river business.

At this time there are three gasoline launches on the ways receiving an overhauling and a large sand digger is all but completed. It is expected that within a few days the keel for a large steamboat will be laid.

The Knox boat yard has enjoyed a successful business since about the year 1800, and its reputation extends far and near. Mr. Hammitt will, no doubt, continue to merit this standing and his acquaintance among rivermen will insure the bringing of much boat building to this city.

GREENBRIERsternViewForNORI

GREENBRIER stern view

JuliaBelleSternNight1972ImprovedForNORI

JULIA BELLE SWAIN stern lit for cameras

Scanned from a 35mm color slide of the JULIA BELLE SWAIN while she was being filmed at night with lighting of stern for the motion picture camera during filming of TOM SAWYER on the Missouri River near Arrow Rock in 1972.







moremusejmphotosclickhere

With the exception of images credited to public institutions,
everything on this page is from a private collection.
Please contact Steamboats.com for permission for commercial use.*

logo