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Steamboats in the Movies, Page 6


SecondImageSacramentoSteamerFLORA_RooneyHUCKFINN1939reducedforNORI

FirstImageSacramentoSteamerFLORA_RooneyHUCKFINN1939forNORI

Two 8 x 10 publicity stills. FLORA as the "River Queen" steaming away from the Sacramento River landing. Mickey Rooney as Huck Finn stood waving good bye as he stood next to Elizabeth Risdon as "the Widow Douglas." There was a lot of restoration that needed to be done to these. Sometimes you can't see the glitches until you've scanned them and look at them on the monitor.

steamboats in movies

Dickie Jones as cub pilot Sam Clemens and Robert Barrat as Horace Bixby in the The Adventures of Mark Twain (1944). The kid is 13 years old but Clemens was actually 22 years old when he met Bixby and discussed learning the river under him. The movie perpetuated the myth that Clemens went straight from Hannibal into the river trade but he was actually 17 when he left Hannibal then spent five years as a journeyman printer before tackling boat piloting. I think they looked at the illustrations in Life on the Mississippi and saw that the cub was represented as a "mere boy" so it was easier to skip over the printer years and cut to the chase and have him larnin' the river.

steamboats in movies

Frederic March as Sam Clemens steamboat pilot in The Adventures of Mark Twain (1944). Clemens didn't have a mustache at this point in his life (late 1850's/early 1860's) but instead wore lambchop sideburns. The fictional boat this pilot house is supposed to be on is called the Queen of Dixie in the movie.

steamboats in movies

Set still for the "SALON" of the "QUEEN OF DIXIE" for that 1944 Warner Bros. biopic "The Adventures of Mark Twain." Nice gingerbread, long and deep - doesn't look like they cheated with mirrors or forced perspective tricks.

steamboats in movies

From an original 8 X 10 movie still of the full size prop boat built for "Little Old New York," a 1940 20th Century Fox highly fictionalized "biopic" about Robert Fulton. The first trip of the Clermont in August, 1807 was from New York to Albany and back, and it averaged about five miles an hour. The dawn of steamboatin' USA.

The Clermont was named after Fulton's friend Robert Livingston's home on the Hudson River. Robert Livingston was a U.S. ambassador to France and one of the two men who made possible the Louisiana Purchase for the U.S. With Livingston's support, Fulton had previously built a steamboat that operated in France on the Seine in 1803. In 1808 Fulton married Livingston's niece Harriet. Awww- isn't it romantic?

steamboats in movies

Mickey Rooney Huck Finn

Warner Bros. is now selling a DVD of the 1944 Frederic March "biopic" The Adventures of Mark Twain.

Attached 4 screen captures of the steamboat model. It looked best at night in the fog in silhouette.

The stills of the FLORA on the Sacramento River above are from the 1939 Mickey Rooney version of Huck Finn which is also available from Warner Bros. For more info.: WBshop.com
Warner Bros. Official Online Store
Adventures of Mark Twain, The (EST-MOD) $19.95
Adventures of Huck Finn, The (1939)(MOD)
Shipping & Handling: $5.95

steamboat movies

The GORDON C. GREEN in the 1957 Warner Bros. Civil War movie BAND OF ANGELS. Bottom photo she's getting an assist from a tug boat and small tow boat. These boats were out of sight of the motion picture camera so this was an unusual "behind the scenes" production still. Filmed on the Mississippi at Geismar, Louisiana.

steamboat movies

From Disney's 1976 movie, Treasure of Matecumbe. Here are three frames of the steamboat model and one frame of the cabin interior which the art department designed nicely with authentic arches, skylights and transoms. Joan Hackett (in white) as pretty and quirky heroine Lauriette Paxton. John Myhers as Captain Boomer (standing left in uniform) and Dick Van Patten seated right played a crooked card sharp who is beaten at his own game by Lauriette.

Treasure of Matecumbe
Walt Disney Productions
1976
directed by Vincent McEveety
based on the the novel Voyage to Matecumbe (1961) by Robert Lewis Taylor
locations in the South: Danville, Kentucky and the Kentucky River





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